‘If you speak out you die’ say Colombian villagers fighting death squads and oil giants

5 July 2016 - 2:00pm
War on Want in the news

War on Want in the Scotsman, read Michael Gillard's: 'If you speak out you die' say Colombian villagers fighting death squads and oil giants.

Michael was recently at the inauguration of a training school funded by War on Want as part of our Oil Justice Campaign: The Daniel Abril Fuentes School of environmental and social research, named after a 38-year old cattle farmer and environmental activist gunned down on 13 November last year in Trinindad, a town in Casanare long dominated by paramilitaries. 

Photograph: Michael Gillard

The pain and the tears wont stop. I would give anything just to know what happened,' says Hector Abril, father of murdered environmental activist Daniel Abril, pictured with his grandson Daniel junior and daughter. 

The Oil Justice Project seeks to build community capacity and empower individuals to speak out against environmental and human rights abuses at the hands of oil giants like BP, whose actions and crimes remain in impunity.

Tired of waiting for Colombian courts to deliver justice, communities affected by oil development in the region have been turning to UK courts, where BP's legacy is as much on trial. We stand with these communities as they fight for justice and accountability from companies who feel they are above the law. 

Find out more about the Oil Justice Project.

 

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