Companies Act comes into force, but Brown must go further to achieve targets

1 October 2007 - 1:00am
Press release

The Act represents the biggest shake-up in company law in 150 years, and will for the first time require the largest listed companies to report on their social and environmental impacts, as well as obliging all company directors to take stock of their business activities' effects on employees, communities and the environment.

But campaigners are concerned that the legislation lacks the teeth to make business live up to their obligations, and fails to ensure that companies can be held to account for complicity in human rights abuses and their impact on the environment and the wider society.

Simon McRae, senior campaigns officer at War on Want, said: "The Company Act was a welcome step foward in making UK companies take their social and environmental impacts more seriously. Despite this progress, we need to continue to challenge UK companies not to exploit workers and local communities, particularly those in the global South, as gaps still remain in UK law." The Corporate Responsibility (CORE) Coalition, of which War on Want is a leading member, has published a guide for campaigners on how to use the Act to improve the social and environmental performance of companies. This is available below.


Media contacts: Simon McRae, War on Want: 07779 146043 Hannah Ellis, The Corporate Responsibility (CORE) Coalition: 07952 876929 John Coventry, ActionAid UK: 07734 581 738

]]>

Tax Transparency Now

Demand the EU act for tax transparency now! 

 

Latest news

War on Want's commitment to safeguarding and code of conduct

16 February 2018 - 10:30am

The recent reports regarding the conduct of staff working for international humanitarian and development charities focussing on Oxfam, is a crucial reminder of the importance that charities should place on ensuring effective policies and practices in safeguarding, including commitments to recognise and uphold the dignity of local communities that the sector works with.

Read more

The women of Honduras speak out against electoral fraud

12 February 2018 - 12:15pm

In November, 2017, Hondurans took to the polls to elect a new president, local governors and councillors. However, far from a smooth transition into a new presidency, numerous irregularities and allegations of electoral fraud became apparent, unleashing a post-election crisis.

Read more

Join the conversation

Don’t miss Remi Kanazi (@Remroum​) live in the UK this month! With events in #Leeds, #Brighton, #Bristol and… https://t.co/Ynveh27nYX 21 hours 40 min ago
Support the #McStrike! Call on #McDonalds CEO to recognise the McStrikers’ union! #EndPrecariousContractshttps://t.co/o4sd6i3CD5 1 day 1 hour ago
Alleged electoral fraud has sparked an ongoing political crisis in #Honduras with widespread violence that's moved… https://t.co/H7FE1If9Ff 1 day 2 hours ago