Will we finally see justice for the Marikana miners?

12 December 2016 - 10:45am
Press release

It has been four years since the South African Police Services gunned down almost 150 mine workers at Lonmin's Marikana platinum mine in South Africa. Of those 34 died, in a massacre that shook the country and shocked the world.

On Sunday 11 December 2016 the South African Presidency finally announced that some police officers would be charged for these killings, and that compensation will be paid to the families of those that died.

War on Want's partner, the Marikana Support Campaign, has released the following statement on these developments:

On 11 December, the South African Presidency released a statement entitled, ‘Update by President Zuma on steps taken by departments to implement Farlam Commission recommendations’. The update states that criminal charges have been, or will be, brought against certain senior members of the South African Police Services.

This is an important advancement and is to be welcomed. Four and a half years after the massacre, it is an admission of state culpability for the murder, shooting and wrongful arrests of striking mineworkers in August 2012.

While the Marikana Support Campaign applauds the prosecution of police responsible for the killings, President Zuma’s statement omits any mention of Lonmin and its involvement in this operation.

The evidence presented to the Farlam Commission strongly suggests that Lonmin executives enabled and led this deadly police operation. It is also inconceivable that police would have acted with such force without the go ahead from Cabinet and therefore the prosecutions of senior police officials can only be the beginning of revealing the chain of command that led to the killings.

Latest news

War on Want's commitment to safeguarding and code of conduct

16 February 2018 - 10:30am

The recent reports regarding the conduct of staff working for international humanitarian and development charities focussing on Oxfam, is a crucial reminder of the importance that charities should place on ensuring effective policies and practices in safeguarding, including commitments to recognise and uphold the dignity of local communities that the sector works with.

Read more

The women of Honduras speak out against electoral fraud

12 February 2018 - 12:15pm

In November, 2017, Hondurans took to the polls to elect a new president, local governors and councillors. However, far from a smooth transition into a new presidency, numerous irregularities and allegations of electoral fraud became apparent, unleashing a post-election crisis.

Read more

Join the conversation

Remi Kanazi's UK live tour begins tomorrow in #Leeds, dedicated to the ongoing struggle of the #Palestinian people… https://t.co/o4Ibt7KBGj 10 hours 58 min ago
Our partner @Addameer explains the collective boycott of the Israeli military courts being waged by 450… https://t.co/hyKGuTgHhe 14 hours 43 min ago
"#BDS till we're free". Check out this brilliant rendition of @Lorde's 'Royals' by @Loyals48, dedicated to the resi… https://t.co/MQxybOk3bE 15 hours 4 min ago