FAQs

Below are a selection of the most often asked questions. If you have any queries not answered below, then please contact us.

What will you use my donations for?

We will use your donations effectively to best support War on Want's work fighting global poverty. You can find out exactly how here.

How will you protect my data?

War on Want is committed to maintaining your personal information in a manner which meets the requirements of the Data Protection Act, and will take all reasonable steps to ensure that your personal data is kept secure against unauthorised access, loss, disclosure or destruction. Find out more here.

How do I change my address or email?

Please keep us informed of any changes to your details so we can keep you up to date. You can change your details by using this form, or contact us.

How do I amend my direct debit or standing order?

Direct Debit - you can contact us to change your Direct Debit here.

Standing Order - you will need to contact your bank as we are not able to change your Standing Order on your behalf.

What standards of fundraising practice do you work to?

War on Want follows the highest standards of fundraising practice, as set out in the codes of the Institute of Fundraising,

How does War on Want comply with charity law?

War on Want complies fully with the legal and regulatory framework governing charity activities; find out more here.

Why do we email or call government officials?

Engaging those in positions of power is an important part of making change, even if it is only one element of a broader campaign. Read more here.

Latest news

BDS is a legitimate means of protest against human rights abuse, says War on Want

14 December 2017 - 12:15pm

Campaigning for BDS is a legitimate means of protest, a fact that has been affirmed time and time again by bodies such as the European Union. It’s effectiveness is one of the main reasons why there is an organised campaign led by the Israeli government to shut it down. Students have every right to use their democratic rights to organise and exercise freedom of expression, and should be applauded for calling out violations of international law and human rights abuse.

Read more

Was it too much to expect the WTO to deliver for women?

14 December 2017 - 12:00pm

Argentina, host for this week’s World Trade Organisation, welcomed hundreds of government representatives to Buenos Aires to negotiate the rules of the global trade in goods, services and ecommerce. Lagging far behind other international fora, the WTO made attempts to draw attention to the impact of trade on gender equality, and correspondingly the impact women’s economic productivity can have on trade.

Read more

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At the end of a week of failed #WTO negotiations, read our take on how their policies have failed #women globally:… https://t.co/FxAh1m69y9 22 hours 57 min ago
Inspiration to take action next year. 12 stories of real #resistance in 2017, from #metoo to Brazil’s biggest… https://t.co/oTvV4DgA7p 1 day 1 hour ago
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