War on Want co-signs letter to Liam Fox calling for an end to UK exports of surveillance equipment to Honduras

3 April 2018 - 4:45pm
Press release


Photo credit: Sean Hawkey

War on Want joins 22 other human rights organisations from Honduras and the UK to call on Secretary of State for International Trade Liam Fox to stop UK exports of surveillance equipment to Honduras. The letter challenges the decision of the UK government to sanction the sale of telecommunications interception equipment to Honduras prior to the violent election crisis which unfolded during December.

War on Want's Senior Programmes Officer for Latin America said:

“The UK government has again made Britain complicit in human rights violations by sanctioning the sale of surveillance and 'security' equipment to the Honduran state prior to a 2017 election mired by serious allegations of electoral fraud, militaristic repression and alarming levels of state-sanctioned violence. More than 40 people were killed, with thousands more injured and imprisoned. Honduras is already the world’s deadliest country for environmental and human rights defenders, and one of the most dangerous to be a woman. In both these cases, impunity reigns.

“Honduras is the latest country in a long list of repressive regimes to which the UK government is selling tools for repression – this is unacceptable. Today, we joined 23 other human rights organisations in asking Liam Fox to explain himself." 


Dear Dr Fox,

We, the undersigned, are Honduran and UK based human rights organisations. We are writing to express our dismay about the UK Government’s sanctioning of sales of telecommunications interception equipment to Honduras, given the country’s human rights situation. Furthermore, we were alarmed to learn that the export of this equipment was allowed despite the question of human rights compliance being raised multiple times in Parliament.[1] We urge you to ensure that no further export licences are granted to the Honduran Government for any equipment that could be used for internal repression.

On 8 February, The Guardian revealed that the UK granted export licences for telecommunications interception equipment to be sold to the Honduran Government just before the elections.[2] On 20 February, in response to a written question regarding the licences, the Rt. Hon. Graham Stuart on behalf of the UK Government stated that:

“all export licence applications are considered on a case-by-case basis against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria based on the most up-to-date information and analysis available at the time, including reports from NGOs and our overseas network.”[3]

Firstly, we would like to draw your attention to the fact that recent NGO reports point to an alarming human rights situation in the country as well as targeted repression of human rights defenders (HRDs), including through illegal surveillance:

  • A report by Global Witness in January 2017 entitled ’Honduras: The deadliest place to defend the planet’ reported that 123 land and environmental activists were “murdered in Honduras since the 2009 coup, with countless others threatened, attacked or imprisoned.”[4]
  • Amnesty International’s 2017 report documents security incidents suffered by HRDs including killings, threats, surveillance and harassment.[5]
  • A 2017 report by an independent group of experts into the murder of renowned Honduran environmentalist, Berta Cáceres, demonstrated that state security forces colluded with officials from a hydrodam company to carry out surveillance of members of Cáceres’ organisation, COPINH, as part of a strategy to control and neutralise community protest. Surveillance increased in the months and hours leading up to her assassination.[6]
  • Illegal surveillance of members of COPINH and Berta Cáceres prior to her assassination was not an isolated occurrence, but part of a wider pattern of repression by the Honduran state. A 2016 report by the NGO Peace Brigades International notes that eight prominent Honduran HRDs were on a government list to be put under illegal surveillance. HRDs frequently report the use of surveillance against them, among other tactics to restrict their rights to exercise freedom of expression and association.[7]

Secondly, we note that criterion two of the consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria states the government should:

“exercise special caution and vigilance in granting licences, on a case-by-case basis and taking account of the nature of the equipment, to countries where serious violations of human rights have been established by the competent bodies of the UN, the Council of Europe or by the European Union;”[8]

However, these international bodies have frequently drawn attention to serious human rights violations in Honduras:

  • The EU Parliament adopted a resolution in April 2016 stating that “Honduras has now become one of the most dangerous countries in the region for human rights defenders.”[9]
  • The UN High Commissioner’s 2017 report on Honduras states that: “In a context of stigmatization and questioning of their work, including by government representatives, OHCHR-Honduras continues to document cases of threats, surveillance, information theft and homicides involving human rights defenders.”[10]
  • In August 2016, two top United Nations and Inter-American human rights experts described Honduras as one of the “most hostile and dangerous countries for human rights defenders.”[11]

We therefore consider the Government’s assertion that “the issue of the licence was consistent with the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria and remained so at the time of export”[12] to be a misrepresentation.

Furthermore, in the wake of the contested elections in November 2017, peaceful protests broke out across the country. These were met with brutal state repression, with the OHCHR registering 23 killings, 16 at the hands of the state security forces, with at least 60 people injured, half of them by live ammunition.[13] The national human rights network “Coalition against Impunity” registered at least 50 complaints related to threats and surveillance targeting individuals who participated in protests. In some cases, victims identified the author of the threat or surveillance as members of the National Police or the Military Police.[14]

We note that in recent months the UK Government has repeatedly called on Honduras to prioritise respect for human rights, highlighting in particular freedom of speech and freedom to protest peacefully.[15] However, local organisations have expressed concern that state repression is getting worse. This analysis was echoed by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein at the UN Human Rights Council in March 2018, who stated that: “The already fragile human rights situation in Honduras, which suffers from high levels of violence and insecurity, is likely to deteriorate further unless there is true accountability for human rights violations.”[16] We are concerned that in licensing the export of telecommunications interception equipment to the Honduran Government, the UK is in fact contributing to the curtailment of fundamental human rights in the country.

Taking into account the above, there is reason to believe that the telecommunications interception equipment are highly likely to be used for internal repression. We urge you to ensure that no further export licenses are granted to the Honduran Government for any equipment that could be used for internal repression.

We look forward to hearing from you further to the above.

Yours sincerely,

Amnesty International UK
Asociación de Jueces por la Democracia
Asociación LGTB Arcoíris de Honduras
La Asociación por la Democracia y los Derechos Humanos (ASOPODEHU)
ATALC-Amigos de la Tierra (FoE) América Latina y El Caribe
The Business and Human Rights Resource Centre
Campaign Against Arms Trade
La Coalición contra la Impunidad
Coordinadora de Organizaciones Populares del Aguan (COPA)
The Corporate Responsibility Coalition (CORE)
The Environmental Network for Central America (ENCA)
Foro de Mujeres por la Vida
Fronteras Comunes de Canadá
Global Justice Now
Global Witness
Grupo Lésbico Bisexual LITOS
Latin American Mining Monitoring Programme
Movimiento Madre Tierra Honduras
Movimiento Mesoamericano contra el Modelo extractivo Minero -M4-
Organización Fraternal Negra Hondureña (OFRANEH)
PAPDA – Haïti
Tavistock Peace Action Group
War on Want


Estimado Dr. Fox,

Los abajo firmantes somos organizaciones de derechos humanos de Honduras y Reino Unido. Le escribimos para expresarle nuestra consternación sobre las autorizaciones para la venta de equipos para la interceptación de las telecomunicaciones a Honduras, dada la situación actual en cuanto a derechos humanos en el país. Además, nos alarmamos al saber que el gobierno de Reino Unido decidió exportar este equipo a pesar de que las preocupaciones sobre estándares de los derechos humanos fueron planteadas en el Parlamento varias veces.[1] Le urgimos a que no otorguen más licencias de exportaciones a equipos que podrían ser utilizados para la represión interna.

El pasado 8 de Febrero, The Guardian reveló que el Reino Unido otorgó licencias de exportación de equipos para la intervención de telecomunicaciones para que fuesen vendidos al gobierno de Honduras justo antes de las elecciones.[2] El 20 de febrero, en respuesta a una pregunta parlamentaria en referencia a dichas licencias, el honorable señor Graham Stuart en nombre del gobierno de Reino Unido señaló lo siguiente:

“todas las solicitudes de licencias de exportación se considerarán caso por caso teniendo en cuenta los criterios nacionales y de la UE en cuanto a licencias de exportación de armas y basándose en la información y análisis más actuales del momento, incluyendo informes de ONGs y de nuestra red exterior.”[3]

En primer lugar, nos gustaría llamar su atención sobre el hecho de que los informes  recientes de las ONGs apuntan hacia una alarmante situación de los derechos humanos en el país así como también a una represión dirigida hacia las personas defensoras de derechos humanos, mediante incluso vigilancia ilegal:

  • Un informe de Global Witness de enero de 2017 titulado ‘Honduras: El lugar más mortífero para la defensa del planeta’ reportó que 123 activistas protectores del medio ambiente y la tierra fueron “asesinados en Honduras desde el golpe de estado de 2009, sin contar las amenazas, ataques o encarcelamientos.[4]
  • El informe de Amnistía Internacional de 2017 documenta incidentes de seguridad sufridos por personas defensoras de derechos humanos incluyendo asesinatos, amenazas, vigilancia y acoso.[5]
  • Un informe de 2017 de un grupo de expertos independientes sobre el asesinato de la renombrada ambientalista, Berta Cáceres, demostró que las fuerzas de seguridad del Estado en connivencia con personal de la empresa hidroeléctrica llevaron a cabo seguimientos y vigilancia a miembros de la misma organización de Berta Cáceres, COPINH, como parte de una estrategia para controlar y neutralizar la protesta de la comunidad. La vigilancia se incrementó en los meses y horas previas a su asesinato.[6]
  • La vigilancia ilegal de los miembros de COPINH y Berta Cáceres previo a su asesinato no fueron un hecho aislado, sino que forman parte de un patrón de represión por parte del Estado Hondureño. Un informe de la ONG Brigadas Internacionales de Paz destaca que ocho personas destacadas por la defensa de derechos humanos estuvieron en una lista del gobierno para ser vigilados de manera ilegal. Los defensores y defensoras de derechos humanos denuncian frecuentemente el uso de la vigilancia/inteligencia contra ellos, entre otras tácticas están las restricciones para el libre ejercicio de la libertad de expresión y asociación.[7]

En segundo lugar, el criterio número dos de los criterios consolidados nacionales y de la UE para la autorización de la exportación de armas, estipula que el gobierno debería:

“ejercer una especial atención y vigilancia a la hora de otorgar licencias, estudiando caso por caso y teniendo en cuenta la naturaleza de los equipos, para los países donde se constaten serias violaciones de derechos humanos por parte de los organismos competentes de las Naciones Unidas, el Consejo Europeo o la Unión Europea;”[8]

Estos organismos internacionales han puesto su atención sobre las serias violaciones de derechos humanos en Honduras:

  • El parlamento Europeo adoptó una resolución en abril del 2016 indicando que “Honduras se ha convertido en uno de los países más eligrosos en la región para los y las defensoras de derechos humanos”.[9]
  • El informe sobre Honduras de 2017 del alto comisionado de Naciones Unidas afirma que: “En un contexto de estigmatización y cuestionamiento de su trabajo incluso por parte de los representantes del gobierno, OACNUDH-Honduras sigue documentando casos de amenazas, seguimientos, robo de información y homicidios contra personas defensoras de derechos humanos.[10]
  • En agosto de 2016, dos expertos en derechos humanos del sistema Inter-América y de Naciones Unidas describieron a Honduras como uno de “los países más hostiles y peligrosos para los defensores de derechos humanos.”[11]

Por lo tanto, consideramos la afirmación del Gobierno de que "la cuestión de la licencia era coherente con los criterios consolidados de concesión de licencias de exportación de armas de la UE y nacionales y seguía siéndolo en el momento de la exportación"[12] como una tergiversación.

Además, como resultado de las disputadas elecciones en noviembre 2017, surgieron protestas pacíficas a lo largo y ancho del país. Estas fueron contestadas con una brutal represión del Estado, OACNUDH registró 23 asesinatos, 16 a manos de las fuerzas de seguridad del Estado y al menos 60 personas fueron heridas, la mitad de ellos por munición real.[13] La red nacional por los derechos humanos “Coalición contra la impunidad” registro por lo menos 50 denuncias relacionadas con amenazas y vigilancia ilegal para identificar a quienes participaban en las protestas. En algunos casos, las víctimas identificaron a los autores de las amenazas o seguimientos como miembros de la Policía Nacional o de la Policía Militar.[14]

Destacamos que en los últimos meses el gobierno de Reino Unido ha pedido repetidamente a Honduras para que priorice el respeto por los derechos humanos, resaltando en particular la libertad de expresión y la libertad de la protesta pacífica.[15] De cualquier modo, organizaciones locales han expresado preocupación por la escalada de la represión del Estado. De este análisis se hizo eco el alto comisionado para los derechos humanos Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein en el Consejo de Naciones Unidas en marzo de 2017 quien afirmó: “La frágil ya situación de los derechos humanos en Honduras, que sufre de los altos niveles de violencia e inseguridad, se va a deteriorar más a no ser que se haga una verdadera rendición de cuentas en cuanto a las violaciones de los derechos humanos.”[16] Nos preocupa que la autorización para la exportación de equipos para la interceptación de las telecomunicaciones al gobierno de Honduras, suponga de facto que el Reino Unido contribuya a la restricción de derechos humanos fundamentales en el país.

Teniendo en cuenta todo lo anterior, existen razones para creer que los equipamientos para la interceptación de las telecomunicaciones serán usados para la represión interna. Quisiéramos urgirle de que no se otorguen más licencias de exportación al gobierno hondureño por ningún equipo que pueda ser utilizado para la represión interna.

Esperamos noticias suyas en relación a lo expuesto.

Cordialmente,

Amnesty International UK
Asociación de Jueces por la Democracia
Asociación LGTB Arcoíris de Honduras
La Asociación por la Democracia y los Derechos Humanos (ASOPODEHU)
ATALC-Amigos de la Tierra (FoE) América Latina y El Caribe
The Business and Human Rights Resource Centre
Campaign Against Arms Trade
La Coalición contra la Impunidad
Coordinadora de Organizaciones Populares del Aguan (COPA)
The Corporate Responsibility Coalition (CORE)
The Environmental Network for Central America (ENCA)
Foro de Mujeres por la Vida
Fronteras Comunes de Canadá
Global Justice Now
Global Witness
Grupo Lésbico Bisexual LITOS
Latin American Mining Monitoring Programme
Movimiento Madre Tierra Honduras
Movimiento Mesoamericano contra el Modelo extractivo Minero -M4-
Organización Fraternal Negra Hondureña (OFRANEH)
PAPDA – Haïti
Tavistock Peace Action Group
War on Want


[1] Written questions ‘Honduras: Arms Trade’/’Honduras: Electronic Surveillance’ 8 February 2018 -12 March 2018

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-questions-answers/?house=commons&max=20&member=4615&page=1&questiontype=AllQuestions

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-03-12/131977/

[2] The Guardian. ‘UK sold spyware to Honduras just before crackdown on election protesters.’ February 2018

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/feb/08/uk-sold-spyware-to-honduras-just-before-crackdown-on-election-protesters

[3] Honduras: Electronic Surveillance:Written question - 127539. February 2018

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-02-08/127539/

[4] Global Witness. ’Honduras: The deadliest place to defend the planet.’ January 2017

https://www.globalwitness.org/en-gb/campaigns/environmental-activists/honduras-deadliest-country-world-environmental-activism/

[5] Amnesty International Report 2017/18

https://www.amnesty.org/en/countries/americas/honduras/

[6] GAIPE. ‘Dam Violence: The plan that Killed Berta Cáceres.’ November 2017.

https://justassociates.org/sites/justassociates.org/files/exec_summ_dam_violencia_en_final.pdf

[7] PBI Honduras Bulletin. December 2016

http://www.pbi-honduras.org/fileadmin/user_files/projects/honduras/files/Bulletins/BOL04-EN-12-l.pdf

[8] EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201314/cmhansrd/cm140325/wmstext/140325m0001.htm#14032566000018

[9] European Parliament resolution of 14 April 2016 on Honduras: situation of human rights defenders. April 2016

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/sides/getDoc.do?type=TA&reference=P8-TA-2016-0129&language=EN&ring=P8-RC-2016-0469

[10] Annual report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the human rights situation in Honduras. February 2017

http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Countries/HN/2017ReportElectionsHRViolations_Honduras_EN.pdf

[11] ‘Honduras, one of the most dangerous countries for human rights defenders – Experts warn’. August 2016

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=20397&LangID=E

[12] Honduras: Electronic Surveillance:Written question - 130861. March 2018

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-03-05/130861/

[13] Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights ‘Human rights violations in the context of the 2017 elections in Honduras.’ March 2018

http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Countries/HN/2017ReportElectionsHRViolations_Honduras_EN.pdf

[14] ibid

[15] ‘British Embassy calls for restraint in Honduras’, 19 Dec 2017; ‘Honduras’ General Elections’, 8 Jan 2018; ‘UK Statement following the Presidential inauguration in Honduras.’ 31 Jan 2018

https://www.gov.uk/government/announcements?include_world_location_news=1&world_locations%5B%5D=honduras

[16] ‘Honduras election protests met with excessive and lethal force – UN report.’ March 2018

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=22799&LangID=E

Latest news

Indigenous Colombians threatened with death for opposition to mega-mining project as defenders visit UK

16 October 2018 - 11:00am

“Death to all these scum”: threats made by far-right paramilitaries promise to “clean” the region of indigenous Wayúu campaigning against mega-mining projects by UK-listed companies in their ancestral lands. Threats arrive just days before a week of action launches in London to highlight the issue. Delegates have arrived from the United States, Brazil, Chile and Colombia, including Wayúu community leader, Misael Socarras Ipuana.

Read more

Fast Food Shut Down FFS410 Report Back

15 October 2018 - 4:45pm

On 4th October 2018 there was an historic co-ordinated strike of hospitality workers. It was named “Fast Food Shutdown 4-10” (#FFS410). Workers in hospitality and food couriers in the gig economy took action across the UK to demand an end to poverty wages and for their right to a union to be respected.

Read more

Join the conversation

Lauren Townsend says young people are out there & want to because work doesn’t have to be lik… https://t.co/S06yXkD3WJ 2 hours 26 min ago
RT : Incredible to me how many people tell me that they want to know my stance on Brexit and People’s Vote as that’s the… https://t.co/4bdbnJTGFz 2 hours 31 min ago
RT : from unite community south east speaking at our trades council seminar this afternoon about… https://t.co/hTcR0z0Z9i 2 hours 33 min ago