Resources

Annual Review 2011

January 2011

The coming year will be a special one for War on Want, as the organisation marks its 60th birthday. This annual review looks back at our proud history, as well as looking forward to what we wish to achieve in the year ahead.

PDF icon 29121_PL_Review 2010.pdf

Taking Liberties

December 2010

This report, published jointly with Labour Behind the Label, provides yet another example of the exploitation that lies behind the clothes sold on the UK high street.

PDF icon Taking Liberties.pdf

Women's labour migration in the context of globalisation

November 2010

This report looks at women's labour migration in the manufacturing export sectors, highlighting that the hiring of young, flexible and cheap women workers forms an explicit strategy of governments and big corporations in the export sector.

PDF icon WIDE WOM MIGR corr.pdf

Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions

November 2010

This report exposes the companies that are profiting from the Occupation and calls on ordinary people around the world to take action.

PDF icon Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions.pdf

Up Front: Women at work

September 2010

Whether on farms, plantations or in factories, women are more likely than men to suffer from poverty wages, as well as deplorable working conditions and physical abuse on the job.

PDF icon Up Front - women at work.pdf

A Bitter Cup

July 2010

Although the tea industry is booming and UK supermarkets are cashing in, workers in India and Keny are harassed, poorly paid  and denied trade union rights on tea plantations and in tea packing factories.

PDF icon A Bitter Cup.pdf

Up Front: South Africa 2010

May 2010

While vast sums have been invested in tourist facilities ahead of the 2010 World Cup, millions of South Africans today face appalling living conditions.

PDF icon Up Front -- South Africa 2010.pdf

Annual Review 2010

January 2010

War on Want's 2010 Annual Review shows how we sustained our work at record levels over the past year.

PDF icon annual.review.2010.pdf

Up Front: Love Fashion Hate Sweatshops

November 2009

We love fashion. But the clothes we buy in the UK come at a terrible human cost. Millions of workers around the world suffer poverty wages ard dire conditions, producing cheap fashion for sale in our high street shops. This can't go on.

PDF icon Love Fashion Hate Sweatshops - Up Front.pdf

Briefing: No More Business As Usual

November 2009

The world is in the midst of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Millions of jobs have already been destroyed and millions more are under threat.

PDF icon No more business as usual.pdf

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